Social Media: Vitamins of the Web

Like getting enough vitamins or fiber in your daily diet, social media might actually be good for you. Things like blogging and podcasting, you say? Indeed. Let me show you some examples.

This report from The Boston Globe entitled "Blogs 'essential' to a good career" pretty much says it all. But, in typical Luke fashion, please allow me expound upon the self-evident. The articles lists several excellent reasons to blog, one of which is to help you launch your career by demonstrating your work-ethic and mental processes. If you don't believe me, check this out.

And, as you know, corporations can reap the benefits as well. Sure, we've been talking about this for a while, but here's a study that actually gives some empirical data. This study, pointed out to me by David Phillips on FIR (thank you), indicates that blogs have "relational strategies," such as conversational human voice and commitment. These strategies were found to correlate significantly with relational outcomes such as "trust, satisfaction, control mutuality, [and] commitment." Blogging can make your organization seem like Soylent Green, you know, made of people. It has worked wonders for Microsoft…

Podcasting, how does this fit in? Easy, for many of the same reasons as The Boston Globe article about blogging. Plus, listening to podcasts in their entirety could get you a two-minute self promotion spot on a major mash-up edition of influential industry-related podcasts. Chris, I listened to the FIR#131 and ATS #29 mash-up. Your promo was great, good luck.

And some new information about the web in general is always good. For instance, the Pew Internet & American Life Project released a study (abstract w/link to pdf) last week showed a gigantic increase in the influence the Internet has on our lives (hat tip). You don't have to tell me! Nearly half of my graduate education came from the Internet – by my own choice, of course. Some stats:

  • 50% in the number who said the internet played a major role as they pursued more training for their careers.
  • 43% in the number who said the internet played a major role when they looked for a new place to live.
  • 14% in the number who said the internet played a major role as they switched jobs.

In sum: Social media is good for you. The Internet continues to grow in popularity and usefulness. Eat your fruits and veggies. Any questions?

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3 Responses

  1. Thanks again, Luke!

  2. Luke,
    Don’t know if you read my prospectus yet, but I would like to point out the article by Cameron Marlow (2004) who looked at links as a form of social currency or interactions. Blogrolls, permalinks, comments, and trackbacks link subtypes that are measurable social connections online. Where permalinks actually represent influence, readership and the strength of the social tie. I thought it was an interesting and significant concept.

    If anyone is interested in this article the best way to access it is through a Google search and typing in “Marlow, C Audience, structure and authority in the weblog community.”

  3. NO, OKAY, I HAVEN’T READ IT!! I’VE BEEN BUSY – IT’S ON MY LIST!
    Seriously, it is on my schedule for this week. Now that I’ve finished my own project (sort of), I can take my head out of the giant barrel it feels like it’s been in and give it a look-see. I do remember us talking about the article. Sounds like a good one for the post, thanks for pointing it out.

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