RSS in Plain English – Finally

rss-in-english.jpgThis is a great video pointed out to by Donna, Neville, and others via blog and twitter. I’ve been a big fan of RSS for over a year now and I always look for ways to show people its advantages. I want people to understand how it revolutionizes how we consume information.

As PR people, we need to be in-the-know and connected, always. Why visit news sites and blogs to find out if there’s something new? Time waster. Let them tell you. Skimming headlines has never been easier. Check out the video.

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Blogger criticizes local paper typo – what a jerk

beaconjournal.JPGAlso titled: Do I have a right to be snobby?

Seriously, as a blogger, do I have any right to be snobby? Here is a local paper with serious reporters, ethical standards, and a decent website and here I am, a nobody, mocking it.

Is that right?

Probably not.

Incidentally, the print version was fine and it was fixed a few hours later so I guess I don’t have any compaints.

I was listening to FIR #184 this morning (blog page, show notes) and Shel made some great comments about headlines. Especially in this day of RSS, we really need to be descriptive and informative in our headlines if we expect people to pay attention to the messages. This goes for newspapers, bloggers, and more. As a PR professional, I scan over 140 feeds in my aggregator to attempt to stay on top of events. Many of those feeds are headline only, no lead paragraph. I may be missing information, though I try not to. Think about that when crafting headlines for your blog, your website, or your client. RSS is changing not only the way we get information, but how we get information out.