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Friday Frivolity – How to write good

How to write good. Yep, says it all. PR people, writers and English language snobs aficionados will enjoy this list of writing tips, tongue firmly planted in cheek. My favorites are:

10. Do not use a foreign word when there is an adequate English quid pro quo.

27. Never use a big word when a diminutive alternative would suffice.

32. Don’t repeat yourself, or say again what you have said before.

33. Don’t be redundant.

47. Everyone should be careful to use a singular pronoun with singular nouns in their writing.

PlainLanguage.gov provided this short, funny read that made me laugh. For professional communicators and writers, it provides a smart bit of humor. Check it out.

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One Response

  1. Didn’t George Orwell add to something like:

    1. Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
    2. Never use a long word where a short one will do.
    3. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
    4. Never use the passive where you can use the active.
    5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word, if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
    6. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

    For the whole piece, Politics and the English Language see
    http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/orwell46.htm

    I particualrly like number 6!

    Liam Fitzpatrick

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